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Sharing the wonderfulness of Robert Culp

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Inside Out Revisited: Tidbits

I didn’t start mining through the Google newspaper archive until I was doing research for the movie A Name for Evil and now I find myself getting lost looking back through old newspapers. (I’m a history buff anyway). Subsequently, I’ve been digging through looking for whatever I can for whatever Robert Culp movie or tv show I’m writing about next but since I only just started doing this, movies such as Inside Out (and Hannie Caulder) missed out initially.

So, I did a little searching around and found a couple of interesting tidbits for Inside Out. The first being a note in one of Marilyn Beck’s columns from March 19, 1975, saying that Robert Culp took part in a tennis tournament in Berlin during filming of Inside Out. The tournament, held annually, was called “The Divided City Tennis Competition” and Culp’s partner was a US Consul and career CIA political officer, Merron L. Latta. Culp and Mr. Latta defeated their French opponents 9 – 6.

Another tidbit involved not Culp, but Telly Savalas, who endured tabloid garbage from the Daily Mail alleging that during filming he partied all night until 4am, didn’t remember his lines and kept his co-star (James Mason) waiting.  Savalas filed a libel suit against the Daily Mail and a year later won, to the tune of $56,700.

Mason, for his part, defended Savalas and paid him compliment in court, talking about how inexperienced people tend to put too much emphasis on learning just the lines, while actors like Savalas exercise a little more creativity with the words and dialogue.

Nowhere in any of the articles I found relating to this was there any comment or quote from Culp, who I imagine kept otherwise busy with the tennis tournament and stayed the hell out of  Savalas’s legal issue.

And, of course, I found a few reviews of the movie.  Michael Marzella, a staff writer for the St. Petersburg (Florida) Times panned the movie in February of 1976 calling it “dull” and “hollow trash.” He went further to say that after seeing the movie “any jury in the land would convict (the) actors of attempted suspense and recommend no mercy.”  For Culp specifically, he noted, “Culp smiles very nicely and usually remembers his lines.”

Ouch. Perhaps Mr. Marzella was just having a bad day?

Another reviewer, Jim Moorhead of The (St. Petersburg, FL ) Evening Independent wasn’t quite as harsh in February of ’76, but he lamented the films’ lack of a clever plot. Despite various faults he found with the movie (the lack of using actual German or Russian dialogue in the scenes involving Germans and/or Russians) he did say the film is “a diverting and amusing evening’s entertainment.”

And the last tidbit I found comes from the North Island Gazette of Port Hardy, British Columbia, where the film was screened in the 16mm format fairly early in the film’s release period (March/April, 1976) due to Warner Brothers apparently deciding not to release Inside Out in the 35mm market. This was apparently significant at the time and the Port Hardy screening was only the second such screening of the movie throughout all of British Columbia (after Vancouver). I’m not all that well versed on the technical aspects of the film world at that time, the difference between American and Canadian releases, nor do I fully understand what the difference is between the 16mm and 35mm market – other than the 16mm was usually screened much later after a film’s release, according to the article. But apparently this was a “minor coup” at the time for 16mm markets. If anyone can comment further on this, please do as I’ll admit I’m curious. The article can be read here.

And one final note, from the same Port Hardy article, while the two reviewers in Florida panned the film, Canadian film critic Michael Walsh described Inside Out as “a completely compentent caper film.” I certainly enjoyed the film and you can check out screen caps and my overview here.

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More Robert Culp Desktop Wallpapers

This could get addictive.  Heh heh.

I’ve added two more desktop wallpapers to the Photo Gallery, this time featuring photos from Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (which I haven’t even watched yet! Sheesh!). These photos come from that eBay auction that I wrote about previously.

Also, as promised, a Maxwell wallpaper has been added. A great action shot from the The Greatest American Hero episode “My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys.”

Enjoy!

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Robert Culp Desktop Wallpapers

For many years I’ve enjoyed creating desktop wallpapers and did a slew of Bill Maxwell ones a couple of years ago. I knew it wouldn’t be long before I started doing other Culp images into wallpapers. I’ve added these two to the Photo Gallery and will be adding more soon. (And yes, I’ll share some of the Maxwell ones too!)

Feel free to download them and enjoy on your computer screen!

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A Name for Evil


Originally released, 1973

Oh man. Where do I start with this one?

Early in my exploration of All Things Culp, I kept finding interesting tidbits and discussions about this movie. The descriptors were pretty much the same across the board. The movie was weird, bizarre, strange, it didn’t make sense and, oh yeah, Culp shows all in one scene.

What? Culp shows….what? Well. Ahem…

I bought the movie late last year off Amazon, paying just 4 bucks for the thing. The DVD case carries a warning on it, saying this movie was “not for children or adults who scare easily.”

I paused. Horror flicks really aren’t my gig. I can’t do slasher films and the like. If something so hideous happens to Culp in this thing I’ll be scarred for life, I thought. I mean, there was a warning on the DVD case! Even one of the photos on the case was of Culp who looked like his soul had just been ripped away from him and he was about to lose his life!

Gah. I dunno if I can watch this.

But…none of the online discussions mention anything really horrible or hideous happening in this film. Besides, he’s buck naked in some scene…

Okay, okay. No problem. We can handle this. It can’t be that bad. And if it is, I can always stop the movie. Awright, deep breath. Put the disc in, hit play…

Culp plays Jonathan Blake, an architect, who decides he’s had enough of city living and corporate rat race and he and his wife Johanna (Samantha Eggar) are going to pack up and move to his great- grandfather’s decrepit estate up north. The goal is to rehab the large estate. In celebration of breaking free from the chains of daily city living, John takes his television set and throws it off the balcony.

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Continue reading more of A Name for Evil…

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eBay Regrets

eBay is a dangerous place. Seriously. I only look once in a while because it never fails that I find something, or several somethings, and I could easily blow a small fortune on Robert Culp related material. Not that this is a bad thing but I suppose I have to maintain some semblance of restraint here.

Yeah, right.

Annnnnd as might be expected there are those times when I practice restraint and regret it later.

Last summer there was an auction on eBay for several color negatives (I believe the number was 33) all of Robert Culp from the movie Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice. The images shown on the auction description were these…

                 

I downloaded the scans and pondered about bidding on the negatives but for whatever reason at the time (probably that silly restraint thing) I didn’t bid. The auction came and went ( I don’t remember if they sold or not) and I went about my way, even going in and playing around in my photo program with the scans from the auction. 

                                             

I all but forgot about the auction until a few months ago when another set of negatives from B&C&T&A came up on eBay. Eighteen color negatives this time, all but maybe three of them of Culp. And I saw the one at the top of this strip…

Ohhh… HEE! I gotta have that. I downloaded the scans, like before, but this time I submitted a bid. And I won!

I also fixed up the scanned image and got this, which I’m rather proud of…

I soooo regret not bidding on that first auction last summer (I blew off 33 photos of Culp?! What the hell was I thinking?!?!) Now, I have these 18 or so negatives and I’m not sure what exactly I’m gonna do with them…

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A Name for the Last Taboo

Okay, this will probably bring in some interesting Google search results but I had to comment on this. Last week, Newsweek had an article about male nudity in film and how it seems to be happening more and more nowadays (and beyond film, now “showing” on stage productions and even television.) The article does mention how various A-list actors over the years have bared all in a movie, so it’s not like this is anything new but my first thought was how Robert Culp pushed that envelope himself in the movie “A Name for Evil” over 40 years ago.  What I don’t know is if it was at all noted or realized at the time. The movie technically was never finished and was edited together and released three years later to hardly any notice. It seems that, in recent memory at least, any time an actor or actress bares all in a film, it’s all over the entertainment news. (Anne Hathaway anyone?)

As cosmic timing would have it, I’ve recently completed what will be this month’s mega screen cap post which will be for “A Name for Evil.” Look for it next week!

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